Pictures of LCV at work

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We build and repair footpaths, boardwalks and bridges. (9 pictures).

Clearing the ground at Beecraigs
Description The task was to build two new flights of steps. Here we are preparing the ground by removing tree roots and rocks.
Work site Beecraigs Country Park
Photo credit David Monaghan
Materials for a flight of steps
Description This is the same task as above. This shows all the timber for the steps. The timber is grown at Beecraigs and prepared in their own sawmill.
Work site Beecraigs Country Park
Photo credit David Monaghan
The finished steps
Description Here are the finished flights of steps.
Work site Beecraigs Country Park
Photo credit David Monaghan
Building a boardwalk at Murieston Greenway
Description Here we are building a boardwalk to raise a path above a river that often floods.
Work site Murieston Greenway
Photo credit Graeme Hedger
The finished boardwalk
Description The finished boardwalk.
Work site Murieston Greenway
Photo credit David Monaghan
Stone pitching on Ben Lawers
Description Upland footpath work is one of the most demanding (and most satisfying) tasks we do. Here we are stone pitching in atrocious weather on Ben Lawers. This will produce a very hard-wearing surface for a path up a steep slope.
Work site Ben Lawers
Photo credit Douglas Meiklejohn
Footpath work on Ben Lawers
Description Firm foundations are the key to a good footpath. Two of us are using sledgehammers to compress rubble into a footpath. The path will then be covered with finer gravel to make the walking surface.
Work site Ben Lawers
Photo credit Douglas Meiklejohn
Building an abutment at Blackspout Wood
Description This bridge was built on a steep bank and the action of the stream had worn away the ground supporting the end of the bridge. Two of us are building a dry-stone abutment to repair the damage.
Work site Black Spout Wood
Photo credit Edel Sheridan
Restoring a footpath at Vane Farm
Description On this wintry task we are cutting back the edges of the path, which were very overgrown. This makes this busy path more welcoming for people walking side-by-side.
Work site Vane Farm RSPB Reserve
Photo credit Greg Milne

Coastal work

A dune restoration task at Gullane. (3 pictures).

Digging up marram grass at Gullane
Description We often use marram grass to stabilise sand dunes to prevent them being blown away by the wind. Here we are digging up marram grass at Gullane, before transplanting it.
Work site Gullane Bents
Photo credit David Monaghan
Transplanting marram grass at Gullane
Description Have you ever pushed a wheelbarrow along a beach? Here two of us are moving marram grass along Gullane Beach so that it can be planted in areas where the wind is blowing away the sand.
Work site Gullane Bents
Photo credit David Monaghan
Stablising dunes at Gullane
Description Sand dunes are vulnerable to erosion from the wind and from trampling feet. Here we are working to protect the sand from erosion by laying turf and by planting marram grass.
Work site Gullane Bents
Photo credit David Monaghan

Fencing

We put up post and wire fences as boundary markers or for stock control. We build gates and stiles.(3 pictures).

Completing a stile at Beecraigs
Description Here we are putting the finishing touches to a new stile at Beecraigs Country Park. This stile is on a popular walking route in the park, and will stop people damaging the fence as they climb over it.
Work site Beecraigs Country Park
Photo credit David Monaghan
Repairing a fence on Eigg
Description A sunny day high on a hill on Rum, repairing a deer fence.
Work site Isle of Rum
Photo credit Greg Milne
Digging a strainer post hole
Description Strainer posts are the most important part of a post-and-wire fence because they take the load of the tensioned wire. The post will be buried up to four feet into the ground. Here one of us is digging the hole, with encouragement and supervision from two bystanders.
Work site Woodhall Dean
Photo credit David Monaghan
Fencing at Woodhall Dean
Description Here we are using a mell to drive in an intermediate fence post, and a stob twister to try to keep it vertical.
Work site Woodhall Dean
Photo credit David Monaghan

Habitat management

We do a variety of tasks to maintain and improve local habitats. The work is extremely varied.(5 pictures).

Buring rhododendrons
Description Cutting down and burning rhododendrons is a popular winter task. We cut them down because they are an invasive and destructive weed. We burn them because it is an efficient way of breaking down the branches.
Work site Barfad Farm
Photo credit Greg Milne
Removing sea buckthorn at Aberlady Bay
Description Sea buckthorn provides a useful winter source of berries for birds, but it is very invasive. Here one of us is digging out small sea buckthorn plants to prevent the thicket in the background spreading into the grassland.
Work site Aberlady Bay
Photo credit David Monaghan
Collecting ragwort at Loch Fleet
Description Ragwort has attractive yellow flowers, but is very poisonous to livestock. Here, we have been pulling ragwort, and one of us is carrying bags of the plant along the course of an old railway.
Work site Loch Fleet
Photo credit Edel Sheridan
Meadow work at Bawsinch
Description Here we are cutting out and raking up brambles that are spreading over grassland. The grassland has since been turned into a wild flower meadow.
Work site Bawsinch
Photo credit David Monaghan
Burning rhododendrons on Arran
Description Rhododendrons thrive in the warm wet climate on the west coast of Scotland, and although they have beautiful flowers, they have a devastating effect on the local plant life. The National Trust for Scotland have put a huge effort into controlling them on the Isle of Arran. Here we are working with them to cut and burn rhododendrons.
Work site Isle of Arran
Photo credit Edel Sheridan

Waterways and wetlands

You either enjoy wading around in stinking mud or you hate it! (3 pictures).

Clearing a pond at Vogrie
Description If marginal plants like reedmace are allowed to completely fill a shallow pond, they will turn it into swampy marshland, and will make it less attractive to desirable aquatic wildlife. Here we are digging up, and raking out plants to give an area of clear water. Pond work is a smelly task that you either love or hate!
Work site Vogrie Country Park
Photo credit David Monaghan
Pulling trees out of a pond
Description Here we are pulling fallen trees out of a pond to open it up to daylight and encourage plants to colonise it.
Work site Puddock Wood
Photo credit David Monaghan
Removing reedmace
Description This shallow pond at Aberlady was made to encourage wading birds. Within a few years, a clump of reedmace had colonised one side of the pond and was rapidly spreading across it. We now return regularly to keep the plants under control and maintain the open water.
Work site Aberlady Bay
Photo credit David Monaghan

Woodland management

We grow trees, plant them and look after them when they are young. We also fell trees if necessary.(7 pictures).

Planting hazel at Carrifran Wildwood
Description We are planting a large hazel tree at the edge of Carrifran Wildwood. It's important to get the tree vertical, with its roots well spread out.
Work site Carrifran Wildwood
Photo credit Tim Duffy
Planting on Ben Lawers
Description High on Ben Lawers, the main problem is getting the trees to where they are to be planted. The white bags in the picture are on special harnesses that make trudging across the hillside with 150 small trees on board more comfortable.
Work site Ben Lawers
Photo credit Greg Milne
Creating the new tree nursery
Description We run our own tree nursery, where we grow local native trees from seed. We supply the young trees to local wildlife organisations. We have recently moved our nursery to a new site: this is a picture of the new site shortly after we moved in.
Work site LCV Tree Nursery
Photo credit David Monaghan
Planting up the tree nursery
Description Here one of us is transplanting trees in our new tree nursery
Work site LCV Tree Nursery
Photo credit David Monaghan
Inspecting young trees at Vogrie
Description Young trees need regular care in their first few years until they are properly established. We carry out regular weeding tasks in areas that we have planted. Here one of us is inspecting a tree that we planted the previous year.
Work site Vogrie Country Park
Photo credit Edel Sheridan
Removing sycamore at Peasedean
Description We are often called on to remove invasive non-native species from woodland. Here, one of us is cutting up a sycamore that he has just felled. Sycamore is a relatively recent introduction to Scotland, and it competes aggressively with native trees.
Work site Pease Dean
Photo credit David Monaghan
Cutting up beech in Aberfeldy
Description Beech is not native to Scotland, and we work to remove it when required. Here two of us are removing beech from the birch woodlands near Aberfeldy.
Work site Birks of Aberfeldy
Photo credit David Monaghan