LCV Task Programme

You don't need any experience to come on any of our tasks, and we provide all the tools, training and safety equipment that you need. If you would like more information about whether a task is suitable for you then please contact us.

Please book with our Transport Secretary before the task. To find out how to book, what to bring and where to meet, look at the page about day tasks.

There is also practical information about residential tasks.

Site map

The map below shows the sites in the work programme this quarter

There is also an interactive map of all our work-sites.

Summary Task Programme

Hover (or double tap on touchscreen devices) the mouse pointer over the coloured square next to the task you are interested in for more information.

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Date Site Task and availablity
Mar Sat 18 Holyrood Park Wildflower sowing
Sun 19 Donald Rose Wood Tree care
Sun 26 Roslin Glen Woodland and meadow management
Fri 31 - Sun 2 Knowetop Lochs Residential: Boardwalk and path improvement work
Apr Sun 9 Little Boghead Nature Park Pond work
Sun 16 Little Boghead Nature Park Pond work
Sun 23 Currie Wood Path and bridge work
Sat 29 Pishwanton TBC
TBC 2017-04-29 There are 8 spaces remaining on this task. Please click to view booking information Plenty of spaces
Sun 30 Currie Wood Path and bridge work
Path and bridge work 2017-04-30 Unfortunately, there are no spaces remaining on this task. Please click to register your interest and find out how to join the waiting list! Task full
May Sun 7 Beeslack Wood Path work
Path work 2017-05-07 There are 7 spaces remaining on this task. Please click to view booking information Plenty of spaces
Sun 14 Beeslack Wood Path work
Path work 2017-05-14 There are 5 spaces remaining on this task. Please click to view booking information Plenty of spaces
Sun 21 Roslin Glen Path work
Path work 2017-05-21 There are 8 spaces remaining on this task. Please click to view booking information Plenty of spaces
Sat 27 Pishwanton TBC
TBC 2017-05-27 There are 10 spaces remaining on this task. Please click to view booking information Plenty of spaces
Sun 28 Easter Craiglockhart Hill Meadow raking
Meadow raking 2017-05-28 There are 9 spaces remaining on this task. Please click to view booking information Plenty of spaces
Jun Sun 4 Holyrood Park Himalayan Balsam removal
Himalayan Balsam removal 2017-06-04 There are 8 spaces remaining on this task. Please click to view booking information Plenty of spaces
Sun 11 Holyrood Park Himalayan Balsam removal
Himalayan Balsam removal 2017-06-11 There are 6 spaces remaining on this task. Please click to view booking information Plenty of spaces
Sun 18 Roslin Glen Bank stabilisation
Bank stabilisation 2017-06-18 There are 6 spaces remaining on this task. Please click to view booking information Plenty of spaces
Sun 25 Traprain Law Ragwort removal
Ragwort removal 2017-06-25 There are 7 spaces remaining on this task. Please click to view booking information Plenty of spaces
Jul Sun 2 Holyrood Park Himalayan Balsam removal
Himalayan Balsam removal 2017-07-02 There are 7 spaces remaining on this task. Please click to view booking information Plenty of spaces
Sun 9 - Fri 14 Taynish Residential: Bracken bashing
Residential: Bracken bashing 2017-07-09 There are 5 spaces remaining on this task. Please click to view booking information Plenty of spaces
Sun 16 Traprain Law Ragwort removal
Ragwort removal 2017-07-16 There are 10 spaces remaining on this task. Please click to view booking information Plenty of spaces
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Space information last updated: Friday 28 April

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Detailed Task Programme

Saturday March 18 Holyrood Park:Wildflower sowing

Holyrood Park is the Koh-i-Noor in the crown jewels of Edinburgh's stunning landscape. Comprising 650 acres of mixed grassland and encompassing Arthur's Seat, the iconic Salisbury Crags as well as some of the oldest exposed rocks in Edinburgh this is a vital island for wildlife in the heart of our majestic capital.

On this visit we will be sowing a wildflower meadow

Sunday March 19 Donald Rose Wood:Tree care

Donald Rose Wood near Markinch/Star in Fife is conservation-volunteer owned and planted-from-scratch native species biodiversity woods that LCV has been helping establish on nearly annual tasks since 2000 (on your host Tim Duffy's part of the site).

On this visis we are going to cut away the "Colin Mclean design" chicken-wire cages that protected (from the beautiful but omni-present Roe deer!) all the yews, hollies and other low shrub species that have been planted on the site over 15 years. Most of those are now prospering so well that they are being constrained by the cages and these must be carefully cut away. The chicken wire will be available for reuse by anyone who wishes to use it in similar projects. Volunteers will also get the chance to explore/worm your way into all parts of this bonnie site nestling between two reservoirs.

Sunday March 26 Roslin Glen:Woodland and meadow management

Roslin Glen is a 19 hectare reserve south of Edinburgh to the east of Roslin village and on the south bank of the River North Esk in Midlothian. The site is owned and managed by Midlothian Council. It is a relatively undisturbed mixed deciduous woodland largely made up of native sessile oak, wych-elm and ash, with a shrub layer of hazel and holly. There are also some introduced sycamore, beech and Norway spruce trees which are gradually being removed. The area boasts a rich woodland flora which includes dog's mercury, ramsons, wood-rush and various ferns. Dippers and kingfishers can be seen in the fairly clean waters of the Esk. The area has been put under a Millennium Forest for Scotland grant scheme to return the woodland to a native mixture of trees such as ash, alder, oak, pine and birch.

On this visit we will be maintaining the wildflower meadow and undertaking other woodland management tasks.

Friday March 31 - Sunday April 2 Knowetop Lochs:Residential: Boardwalk and path improvement work

Knowetop Lochs is a small, diverse upland reserve. Two small lochs are separated by a ridge of birch woodland fringed by reed-swamp, bog and willow scrub, with areas of wet and dry heath. Much of the reserve is marshy with willow thickets.

The habitats support otters, adders, scotch argus, barn owls and water voles and pipistrelle bats.

On this, our first visit to the Knowetops reserve we will be working on boardwalks and paths within the reserve. Accomodation will be at the Loch Ken Activity Centre.

Sunday April 9 Little Boghead Nature Park:Pond work

Little Boghead Nature Reserve is a extensive area of greenspace on the outskirts of Bathgate, 20 miles to the west of Edinburgh. It contains a variety of habitats including woodland, meadow, wetland and several small ponds connected by a wooden boardwalk. There is an open grassland area which contains a mix of wildflowers in the spring and summer. The site boasts a wealth of wildlife including 82 species of birds, 14 mammal species and 14 butterfly species.

West Lothian Council Ranger Service has commissioned an ecologist to survey the area and advise on site management, so this task will be dependent upon the results of the survey but will probably involve scrub and/or pond clearance and meadow management.

On this visit we will be clearing invasive vegetation from the many ponds on this site to help maintain the aquatic habitat

Sunday April 16 Little Boghead Nature Park:Pond work

Little Boghead Nature Reserve is a extensive area of greenspace on the outskirts of Bathgate, 20 miles to the west of Edinburgh. It contains a variety of habitats including woodland, meadow, wetland and several small ponds connected by a wooden boardwalk. There is an open grassland area which contains a mix of wildflowers in the spring and summer. The site boasts a wealth of wildlife including 82 species of birds, 14 mammal species and 14 butterfly species.

West Lothian Council Ranger Service has commissioned an ecologist to survey the area and advise on site management, so this task will be dependent upon the results of the survey but will probably involve scrub and/or pond clearance and meadow management.

On this visit we will be clearing invasive vegetation from the many ponds on this site to help maintain the aquatic habitat

Sunday April 23 Currie Wood:Path and bridge work

Currie Wood is located in Borthwick Glen, near the village of North Middleton, 3 km south east of Gorebridge in Midlothian. This hidden gem is close to Edinburgh and includes a circular footpath through fantastic walks with impressive views of the burn below. The site includes a large range of moss and plant species.

On this, our first visit to this new site we will be improving the slip resistance of bridges and maintaining paths within the wood.

Saturday April 29 Pishwanton:TBC

This 22 hectare site is located to the east of Edinburgh 3.2 kilometres south of Gifford, near Haddington in East Lothian. The Life Science Trust was established in 1992 to research, teach and promote education methods that enable people to rediscover connections with the natural world and develop a partnership with their environment. It purchased the woods in 1996 and the site sits at 200m on the edge of the Lammermuir Hills. Occupation of the area dates back to prehistoric times and there is a large Iron Age burial mound. Research and teaching is carried out on a wide variety of topics - medicinal plant study, herb growing, land and craft skills and ecological building methods to name a few. On previous tasks, LCV has planted trees and cut gorse for weaving into a fence. This site can be wet so wellies are strongly recommended if you have them!

Details of this task will be confirmed nearer the time

Sunday April 30 Currie Wood:Path and bridge work

Currie Wood is located in Borthwick Glen, near the village of North Middleton, 3 km south east of Gorebridge in Midlothian. This hidden gem is close to Edinburgh and includes a circular footpath through fantastic walks with impressive views of the burn below. The site includes a large range of moss and plant species.

On this visit we will continue to work on the paths and bridges within the wood

Sunday May 7 Beeslack Wood:Path work

Beeslack Wood is an ancient woodland, most which is located in a river valley situated off the A701 trunk road on the outskirts of Penicuik, Midlothian. The horseshoe-shaped site surrounds the grounds of Beeslack Community High School and Aaron House residential care home. Much of the woodland lies on the valley sides of the River North Esk, which forms the eastern boundary of the site, and of its tributary, the Loan Burn, which runs through the southern arm of the wood. There is a good diversity of ancient woodland flora under a canopy of mainly native braodleaves, with an interesting fauna that can often be seen or heard including dippers along the loan burn, woodpeckers, nuthatches and deer. The woodland leads from Penicuik onto the Penicuik - Dalkeith cyclepath and as such is well used by local people for walking and cycling. Find out more from the Woodland Trust

We will be maintainining and improving access paths within this native woodland.

Sunday May 14 Beeslack Wood:Path work

Beeslack Wood is an ancient woodland, most which is located in a river valley situated off the A701 trunk road on the outskirts of Penicuik, Midlothian. The horseshoe-shaped site surrounds the grounds of Beeslack Community High School and Aaron House residential care home. Much of the woodland lies on the valley sides of the River North Esk, which forms the eastern boundary of the site, and of its tributary, the Loan Burn, which runs through the southern arm of the wood. There is a good diversity of ancient woodland flora under a canopy of mainly native braodleaves, with an interesting fauna that can often be seen or heard including dippers along the loan burn, woodpeckers, nuthatches and deer. The woodland leads from Penicuik onto the Penicuik - Dalkeith cyclepath and as such is well used by local people for walking and cycling. Find out more from the Woodland Trust

We will be maintainining and improving access paths within this native woodland.

Sunday May 21 Roslin Glen:Path work

Roslin Glen is a 19 hectare reserve south of Edinburgh to the east of Roslin village and on the south bank of the River North Esk in Midlothian. The site is owned and managed by Midlothian Council. It is a relatively undisturbed mixed deciduous woodland largely made up of native sessile oak, wych-elm and ash, with a shrub layer of hazel and holly. There are also some introduced sycamore, beech and Norway spruce trees which are gradually being removed. The area boasts a rich woodland flora which includes dog's mercury, ramsons, wood-rush and various ferns. Dippers and kingfishers can be seen in the fairly clean waters of the Esk. The area has been put under a Millennium Forest for Scotland grant scheme to return the woodland to a native mixture of trees such as ash, alder, oak, pine and birch.

On this visit we will be maintaining the paths and boardwalks within the glen

Saturday May 27 Pishwanton:TBC

This 22 hectare site is located to the east of Edinburgh 3.2 kilometres south of Gifford, near Haddington in East Lothian. The Life Science Trust was established in 1992 to research, teach and promote education methods that enable people to rediscover connections with the natural world and develop a partnership with their environment. It purchased the woods in 1996 and the site sits at 200m on the edge of the Lammermuir Hills. Occupation of the area dates back to prehistoric times and there is a large Iron Age burial mound. Research and teaching is carried out on a wide variety of topics - medicinal plant study, herb growing, land and craft skills and ecological building methods to name a few. On previous tasks, LCV has planted trees and cut gorse for weaving into a fence. This site can be wet so wellies are strongly recommended if you have them!

Details of this task will be confirmed nearer the time

Sunday May 28 Easter Craiglockhart Hill:Meadow raking

Craiglockhart Hill is above Craiglockhart Sports Centre and as one of Edinburgh's seven hills, offers excellent views across the city towards the castle and Arthur's Seat. The area is owned jointly by the City of Edinburgh Council and Napier University. We will be working with the Friends of Craiglockhart Nature Trail - a local group supported by the Scottish Wildlife Trust - who have produced a management plan and a trail leaflet, and continue to manage the site for wildlife.

In previous tasks on this LNR LCV has raked two cut meadows and cleared rubbish from the habitat enhancement pond areas - two large areas of vegetation have been planted to add to the biodiversity and give cover for the breeding birds.

On this visit we will once again be raking the meadows on this fine site to help preserve the grassland habitat

Sunday June 4 Holyrood Park:Himalayan Balsam removal

Holyrood Park is the Koh-i-Noor in the crown jewels of Edinburgh's stunning landscape. Comprising 650 acres of mixed grassland and encompassing Arthur's Seat, the iconic Salisbury Crags as well as some of the oldest exposed rocks in Edinburgh this is a vital island for wildlife in the heart of our majestic capital.

On this visit we will be removing invasive himalayan balsam from sensitive areas within the park.

Sunday June 11 Holyrood Park:Himalayan Balsam removal

Holyrood Park is the Koh-i-Noor in the crown jewels of Edinburgh's stunning landscape. Comprising 650 acres of mixed grassland and encompassing Arthur's Seat, the iconic Salisbury Crags as well as some of the oldest exposed rocks in Edinburgh this is a vital island for wildlife in the heart of our majestic capital.

On this visit we will be removing invasive himalayan balsam from sensitive areas within the park.

Sunday June 18 Roslin Glen:Bank stabilisation

Roslin Glen is a 19 hectare reserve south of Edinburgh to the east of Roslin village and on the south bank of the River North Esk in Midlothian. The site is owned and managed by Midlothian Council. It is a relatively undisturbed mixed deciduous woodland largely made up of native sessile oak, wych-elm and ash, with a shrub layer of hazel and holly. There are also some introduced sycamore, beech and Norway spruce trees which are gradually being removed. The area boasts a rich woodland flora which includes dog's mercury, ramsons, wood-rush and various ferns. Dippers and kingfishers can be seen in the fairly clean waters of the Esk. The area has been put under a Millennium Forest for Scotland grant scheme to return the woodland to a native mixture of trees such as ash, alder, oak, pine and birch.

On this visit we will be stabilising the banks within the glen to prevent landslips onto the paths and other features of interest.

Sunday June 25 Traprain Law:Ragwort removal

At 221m Traprain Law is a distinctive, dome shaped hill, which overlooks the East Lothian town of Haddington just to the east of Edinburgh. First occupied about 3500 years ago it has a long history of human activity - there is evidence that the site was used for burial as well as for manufacturing bronze tools. In the early twentieth century archaeologists working on the site uncovered a cache of Roman silverware. It is believed that the mythical King Loth of the Goddodin, from whom the Lothians take their name, ruled from the hill in the first half of the fourth century.

On this visit we will be removing invasive ragwort to protect the rare-breed ponies that graze the hillside to maintain the habitat.

Sunday July 2 Holyrood Park:Himalayan Balsam removal

Holyrood Park is the Koh-i-Noor in the crown jewels of Edinburgh's stunning landscape. Comprising 650 acres of mixed grassland and encompassing Arthur's Seat, the iconic Salisbury Crags as well as some of the oldest exposed rocks in Edinburgh this is a vital island for wildlife in the heart of our majestic capital.

On this visit we will be removing invasive himalayan balsam from sensitive areas within the park.

Sunday July 9 - Friday July 14 Taynish:Residential: Bracken bashing

The ancient deciduous woodland at Taynish is one of the largest in Britain and thoroughly worth the long trip from Edinburgh. Oak trees have flourished here for 6000 years or more —l a little longer than people have lived here. Once a source of timber and charcoal, these woods now form one of Britain's largest remaining native oakwoods. The importance of the site was recongnised in 1977 by designation as a National Nature Reserve and it is now managed by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH). Taynish lies on a scienci peninsula overlooking Loch Sween, which was scoured out by glaciers 11000 years ago and has an atmosphere all of its own.

The peninsula has a wide range of habitats, including shoreline, grassland, scrub, bog, heath and woodland, each home to a host of plants, insects, birds and mammals that thrive in the clean, humid air. In all, between the woodland's dripping ferns and mosses and the marsh and grassland, over 300 plant species and more than 20 kinds of butterfly are supported. To help the woods keep their near-natural character and rich wildlife, SNH is also removing rhododendron, which crowds out other plants.

Once again we return to Taynish to help suppress excessive bracken growth on the hillsides. This will assist in elimination of deer during the stalking season, reducing predation of the native woodlands in the area

Sunday July 16 Traprain Law:Ragwort removal

At 221m Traprain Law is a distinctive, dome shaped hill, which overlooks the East Lothian town of Haddington just to the east of Edinburgh. First occupied about 3500 years ago it has a long history of human activity - there is evidence that the site was used for burial as well as for manufacturing bronze tools. In the early twentieth century archaeologists working on the site uncovered a cache of Roman silverware. It is believed that the mythical King Loth of the Goddodin, from whom the Lothians take their name, ruled from the hill in the first half of the fourth century.

On this visit we will be removing invasive ragwort to protect the rare-breed ponies that graze the hillside to maintain the habitat